An Examination of Sexual Education in Texas, Bibliography:

Social Security. U.S. Social Security Act, §510(b)(2). Retrieved from: http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/ssact/title05/0500.htm

Texas Legislature Online. (1995). 74(R) Senate Bill 1. Retrieved from: http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/74R/billtext/doc/SB00001F.doc [download]

Texas Department of State Health Services. (2008). School Health Advisory Councils. Retrieved from: https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/schoolhealth/sdhac.shtm

Texas Freedom Network Education Fund. (November 2011). Sex Education in Texas Public Schools: Progress in the Lone Star State. Austin, TX. [download]

Hobbs, T. (6 November 2013). Higher incidence of sexual behavior in Dallas ISD spurs call to action. The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved from: http://www.dallasnews.com/news/education/headlines/20131106-higher-incidence-of-sexual-be havior-in-dallas-isd-spurs-call-to-action.ece

Guttmacher Institute. (1 January 2014). State Policies in Brief: Sex and HIV Education. New York, NY. [download]

Wilson, K., Wiley, D., Rosen, B. (2012). Texas Sexuality Education Instruction: Shame and Fear-Based Methodology. Journal of Health Education Teaching, 3(1), 1-10. [download]

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (November 2007). Emerging Answers 2007: Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Washington, DC: Douglas Kirby, Ph.D. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (1995). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 1993. (MMWR 44, No. SS-1). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (1996). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 1995. (MMWR 45, No. SS-4). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (1998). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 1997. (MMWR 47, No. SS-3). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2000). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 1999. (MMWR 49, No. SS-5). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2002). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2001. (MMWR 51, No. SS-4). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2004). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2003. (MMWR 53, No. SS-2). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2006). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2005. (MMWR 55, No. SS-5). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2008). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2007. (MMWR 57, No. SS-4). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2009. (MMWR 59, No. SS-5). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2011. (MMWR 61, No. 4). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Guttmacher Institute. (March 2013). U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births and Abortions, 2008: State Trends by Age, Race and Ethnicity. New York, NY: Kost, K., Henshaw., S. [download]

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (February 2013). Change in Teen Pregnancy Rates. Retrieved from: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/state-data/state-comparisions.asp?id=3&sID=24

Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (April 2007). Impacts Of Four Title V, Section 510 Abstinence Education Programs, Final Report. Princeton, NJ: Trenholm, C. [download]

National Abstinence Education Fund. (Date unknown). Rejoinder Longitudinal sex education research Methodological issues and limitations. Washington, DC. Retrieved from: http://www.abstinenceworks.org/evidence-qit-doesnt-workq-mainmenu-46-sp-443105798 [download]

Hopkins, J. (February 2005). Abstinence only programmes do not change sexual behaviour, Texas study shows. BMJ. Retrieved from: http://www.bmj.com/content/330/7487/326.3

Stanger-Hall, K., Hall, D. (2011). Abstinence-Only Education and Teen Pregnancy Rates: Why We Need Comprehensive Sex Education in the U.S. PLoS ONE, 6 (10): e24658 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0024658 

Kohler, P., Manhard, L., Lafferty, W. (2008). Abstinence-only and comprehensive sex education and the initiation of sexual activity and teen pregnancy. Journal of Adolescent Health, 42. 344-351. [download]

Santelli, J., et al. (2007). Explaining recent declines in adolescent pregnancy in the United States: the contribution of abstinence and improved contraceptive use. American Journal of Public Health, 97(1):150–156. [download]

San Antonio Express News / Houston Chronicle. (2013). “Howard, Toth And Zedler”. Retrieved from: https://soundcloud.com/dsrauf/howard-toth-and-zedler

Kirell, A. (July 2013). GOP Rep. Gohmert: We Don’t Need Sex Ed Because ‘Mankind Has Existed For Long Time’ Without It. Mediaite. Retrieved from: http://www.mediaite.com/online/gop-rep-gohmert-we-dont-need-sex-ed-because-mankind-has-e xisted-for-long-time-without-it/

Texas Freedom Network Education Fund. (July 2010). Culture Wars in the Classroom: Texas Voters Call for a Cease-Fire. Austin, TX. [download]

Tortolero, S., et al. (October 2011). Dispelling the Myth: What Parents Really Think about Sex Education in Schools. Journal of Applied Research on Children: Informing Policy for Children at Risk, 2(2), Article 5. [download]

Comprehensive Sex Education May Reduce Abortions, Bibliography:

Guttmacher Institute. (2013). Unintended Pregnancy Rates at the State Level: Estimates for 2002, 2004, 2006 and 2008. New York, NY: Kost, K. [download]

Finer, L., et al. (September 2005). Reasons U.S. Women Have Abortions: Quantitative and Qualitative Perspectives. Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 37(3).

Finer, L. (2010). Unintended pregnancy among U.S. adolescents: accounting for sexual activity. Journal of Adolescent Health. [download]

Guttmacher Institute. (2012). U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births and Abortions, 2008: National Trends by Age, Race and Ethnicity. New York, NY: Kost, K., Henshaw, S. [download]

Santelli, J., et al. (2007). Explaining recent declines in adolescent pregnancy in the United States: the  contribution of abstinence and improved contraceptive use. American Journal of Public Health, 97(1):150–156. [download]

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (November 2007). Emerging Answers 2007: Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Washington, DC: Douglas Kirby, Ph.D. [download]

Failure Rate of Abstinence-Intentions: Bibliography

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (November 2007). Emerging Answers 2007: Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Washington, DC: Douglas Kirby, Ph.D. [download]

Martino, C., et al. (2008). Virginity Pledges Among the Willing: Delays in First Intercourse and Consistency of Condom Use. Journal of Adolescent Health, Issue 43.

Brückner, H., Bearman, P. (2005). After the promise: The STD consequences of adolescent virginity pledges. Journal of Adolescent Health, 36(4). 269-270. Retrieved from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X05000558

Marie, J. (2013). How Abstinence-Only Sex Ed is Driving Up STD Rates. Take Part. Retrieved from: http://www.takepart.com/article/2013/04/03/how-abstinence-only-sex-ed-driving-std-rates

Summary of what is taught in Texas Sex Ed: Bibliography

Texas Freedom Network Education Fund. (2009). Just Say Don’t Know: Sexuality Education in Texas Public Schools. Austin, TX: Wiley, D., Wilson, K. [download]

The Failure of Texas' Sex Education Policies: Bibliography

Park, A. (2009). Parent's Sex Talk with Kids: Too Little, Too Late. Time. Retrieved from: http://content.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1945759,00.html

Guttmacher Institute. (March 2013). U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births and Abortions, 2008: State Trends by Age, Race and Ethnicity. New York, NY: Kost, K., Henshaw., S. [download]

Santelli, J., et al. (2007). Explaining recent declines in adolescent pregnancy in the United States: the contribution of abstinence and improved contraceptive use. American Journal of Public Health, 97(1):150–156. [download]

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (February 2013). Change in Teen Pregnancy Rates. Retrieved from: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/state-data/state-comparisions.asp?id=3&sID=24

United Nations Population Fund. (2013). State of the World Population: Motherhood in Chilhood. New York, NY: Kollodge, R. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2011. (MMWR 61, No. 4). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  [download]

Stanger-Hall, K., Hall, D. (2011). Abstinence-Only Education and Teen Pregnancy Rates: Why We Need Comprehensive Sex Education in the U.S PLoS ONE, 6 (10): e24658 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0024658

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (November 2007). Emerging Answers 2007: Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Washington, DC: Douglas Kirby, Ph.D.  [download]

Texas Legislature Online. (1995). 74(R) Senate Bill 1. Retrieved from: http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/74R/billtext/doc/SB00001F.doc  [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2008). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2007. (MMWR 57, No. SS-4). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

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