Secular Texas is an ad hoc group of citizens advocating for the concerns of the secular community of Texas. We seek a rational state government that enacts policy based on scientific realities. Secular Texas also addresses any attempt to use State or Local government resources or power to endorse religion, or provide privilege to religious institutions in Texas.

Secularism in Texas

The secular community in Texas is a fast-growing segment of the population, with 22% of Texans considering themselves non-religious, up from 12% just five years ago, putting Texas above the national average as a home for the non-religious. The electorate is changing and the legislature is going to change with it. If the legislators of Texas want to continue to represent their constituents, it is time to hear the voices of the secular community of Texas.

globe-icon-sqConcerns of Secular Texans

Secular Texas advocates for the concerns of secular Texans. While the concerns of secular communities in Texas are varied, shared concerns include:

  • Solid Science Education
  • Comprehensive Sex Education
  • LGBTQ Equal Rights & Protections
  • Reproductive & Family Planning Rights
  • State / Church Separation 
  • Rational State Government

info-icon-sqHow You Can Help

Local action, such as visiting your legislator in their home office and letting them know that the secular community exists and that we are involved in the political process, is one of the most powerful actions you can take. Visit your legislator and tell us about it! Please take a look at how you can get directly involved with Secular Texas. Support our mission financially by becoming a dues paying member or making a donation.

Recent News

An Examination of Sexual Education in Texas, Bibliography:

Social Security. U.S. Social Security Act, §510(b)(2). Retrieved from: http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/ssact/title05/0500.htm

Texas Legislature Online. (1995). 74(R) Senate Bill 1. Retrieved from: http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/74R/billtext/doc/SB00001F.doc [download]

Texas Department of State Health Services. (2008). School Health Advisory Councils. Retrieved from: https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/schoolhealth/sdhac.shtm

Texas Freedom Network Education Fund. (November 2011). Sex Education in Texas Public Schools: Progress in the Lone Star State. Austin, TX. [download]

Hobbs, T. (6 November 2013). Higher incidence of sexual behavior in Dallas ISD spurs call to action. The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved from: http://www.dallasnews.com/news/education/headlines/20131106-higher-incidence-of-sexual-be havior-in-dallas-isd-spurs-call-to-action.ece

Guttmacher Institute. (1 January 2014). State Policies in Brief: Sex and HIV Education. New York, NY. [download]

Wilson, K., Wiley, D., Rosen, B. (2012). Texas Sexuality Education Instruction: Shame and Fear-Based Methodology. Journal of Health Education Teaching, 3(1), 1-10. [download]

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (November 2007). Emerging Answers 2007: Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Washington, DC: Douglas Kirby, Ph.D. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (1995). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 1993. (MMWR 44, No. SS-1). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (1996). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 1995. (MMWR 45, No. SS-4). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (1998). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 1997. (MMWR 47, No. SS-3). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2000). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 1999. (MMWR 49, No. SS-5). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2002). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2001. (MMWR 51, No. SS-4). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2004). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2003. (MMWR 53, No. SS-2). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2006). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2005. (MMWR 55, No. SS-5). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2008). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2007. (MMWR 57, No. SS-4). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2009. (MMWR 59, No. SS-5). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2011. (MMWR 61, No. 4). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Guttmacher Institute. (March 2013). U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births and Abortions, 2008: State Trends by Age, Race and Ethnicity. New York, NY: Kost, K., Henshaw., S. [download]

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (February 2013). Change in Teen Pregnancy Rates. Retrieved from: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/state-data/state-comparisions.asp?id=3&sID=24

Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (April 2007). Impacts Of Four Title V, Section 510 Abstinence Education Programs, Final Report. Princeton, NJ: Trenholm, C. [download]

National Abstinence Education Fund. (Date unknown). Rejoinder Longitudinal sex education research Methodological issues and limitations. Washington, DC. Retrieved from: http://www.abstinenceworks.org/evidence-qit-doesnt-workq-mainmenu-46-sp-443105798 [download]

Hopkins, J. (February 2005). Abstinence only programmes do not change sexual behaviour, Texas study shows. BMJ. Retrieved from: http://www.bmj.com/content/330/7487/326.3

Stanger-Hall, K., Hall, D. (2011). Abstinence-Only Education and Teen Pregnancy Rates: Why We Need Comprehensive Sex Education in the U.S. PLoS ONE, 6 (10): e24658 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0024658 

Kohler, P., Manhard, L., Lafferty, W. (2008). Abstinence-only and comprehensive sex education and the initiation of sexual activity and teen pregnancy. Journal of Adolescent Health, 42. 344-351. [download]

Santelli, J., et al. (2007). Explaining recent declines in adolescent pregnancy in the United States: the contribution of abstinence and improved contraceptive use. American Journal of Public Health, 97(1):150–156. [download]

San Antonio Express News / Houston Chronicle. (2013). “Howard, Toth And Zedler”. Retrieved from: https://soundcloud.com/dsrauf/howard-toth-and-zedler

Kirell, A. (July 2013). GOP Rep. Gohmert: We Don’t Need Sex Ed Because ‘Mankind Has Existed For Long Time’ Without It. Mediaite. Retrieved from: http://www.mediaite.com/online/gop-rep-gohmert-we-dont-need-sex-ed-because-mankind-has-e xisted-for-long-time-without-it/

Texas Freedom Network Education Fund. (July 2010). Culture Wars in the Classroom: Texas Voters Call for a Cease-Fire. Austin, TX. [download]

Tortolero, S., et al. (October 2011). Dispelling the Myth: What Parents Really Think about Sex Education in Schools. Journal of Applied Research on Children: Informing Policy for Children at Risk, 2(2), Article 5. [download]

Comprehensive Sex Education May Reduce Abortions, Bibliography:

Guttmacher Institute. (2013). Unintended Pregnancy Rates at the State Level: Estimates for 2002, 2004, 2006 and 2008. New York, NY: Kost, K. [download]

Finer, L., et al. (September 2005). Reasons U.S. Women Have Abortions: Quantitative and Qualitative Perspectives. Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 37(3).

Finer, L. (2010). Unintended pregnancy among U.S. adolescents: accounting for sexual activity. Journal of Adolescent Health. [download]

Guttmacher Institute. (2012). U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births and Abortions, 2008: National Trends by Age, Race and Ethnicity. New York, NY: Kost, K., Henshaw, S. [download]

Santelli, J., et al. (2007). Explaining recent declines in adolescent pregnancy in the United States: the  contribution of abstinence and improved contraceptive use. American Journal of Public Health, 97(1):150–156. [download]

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (November 2007). Emerging Answers 2007: Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Washington, DC: Douglas Kirby, Ph.D. [download]

Failure Rate of Abstinence-Intentions: Bibliography

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (November 2007). Emerging Answers 2007: Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Washington, DC: Douglas Kirby, Ph.D. [download]

Martino, C., et al. (2008). Virginity Pledges Among the Willing: Delays in First Intercourse and Consistency of Condom Use. Journal of Adolescent Health, Issue 43.

Brückner, H., Bearman, P. (2005). After the promise: The STD consequences of adolescent virginity pledges. Journal of Adolescent Health, 36(4). 269-270. Retrieved from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X05000558

Marie, J. (2013). How Abstinence-Only Sex Ed is Driving Up STD Rates. Take Part. Retrieved from: http://www.takepart.com/article/2013/04/03/how-abstinence-only-sex-ed-driving-std-rates

Summary of what is taught in Texas Sex Ed: Bibliography

Texas Freedom Network Education Fund. (2009). Just Say Don’t Know: Sexuality Education in Texas Public Schools. Austin, TX: Wiley, D., Wilson, K. [download]

The Failure of Texas' Sex Education Policies: Bibliography

Park, A. (2009). Parent's Sex Talk with Kids: Too Little, Too Late. Time. Retrieved from: http://content.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1945759,00.html

Guttmacher Institute. (March 2013). U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births and Abortions, 2008: State Trends by Age, Race and Ethnicity. New York, NY: Kost, K., Henshaw., S. [download]

Santelli, J., et al. (2007). Explaining recent declines in adolescent pregnancy in the United States: the contribution of abstinence and improved contraceptive use. American Journal of Public Health, 97(1):150–156. [download]

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (February 2013). Change in Teen Pregnancy Rates. Retrieved from: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/state-data/state-comparisions.asp?id=3&sID=24

United Nations Population Fund. (2013). State of the World Population: Motherhood in Chilhood. New York, NY: Kollodge, R. [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2011. (MMWR 61, No. 4). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  [download]

Stanger-Hall, K., Hall, D. (2011). Abstinence-Only Education and Teen Pregnancy Rates: Why We Need Comprehensive Sex Education in the U.S PLoS ONE, 6 (10): e24658 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0024658

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (November 2007). Emerging Answers 2007: Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Washington, DC: Douglas Kirby, Ph.D.  [download]

Texas Legislature Online. (1995). 74(R) Senate Bill 1. Retrieved from: http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/74R/billtext/doc/SB00001F.doc  [download]

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2008). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2007. (MMWR 57, No. SS-4). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [download]

Advocating for the concerns of Secular Texans

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